mydrunkkitchen:

This might be the greatest thing to happen to tea drinking.

I have the same steeper. It is my favorite, by far. I like to make a little “Aaaah! Why did you program me to feel pain?!” squeal every time I use it.

mydrunkkitchen:

This might be the greatest thing to happen to tea drinking.

I have the same steeper. It is my favorite, by far. I like to make a little “Aaaah! Why did you program me to feel pain?!” squeal every time I use it.

918 notes 

seananmcguire:

I really appreciate her rage.

I lost my love for Scarlett sometime after Eight-Legged Freaks, but stuff like this has had me jumping back on the love train for the past year.

(Source: alianovnataliasoldblog)

485,305 notes 

uchicagoadmissions:

Mischief Managed

For those of you who have wondered as hard as we have how we came to get this Indiana Jones journal: we have our solution. 

As some theorized, this did turn out to be the work of “Ravenbar” (real name: Paul, from Guam) on Ebay. After several days we were able to get in touch with Paul, who confirmed with us on Saturday that this was, indeed, his work, but that he did not know how it had gotten to us. Paul contacted us late yesterday to let us know that he had just received a letter (originally we were baffled as to how he got mail on a Sunday, but then we remembered time zones exist) from the USPS sorting service in Honolulu, HI (from a guy who, coincidentally, is also named Paul) stating that the outer package of something he had mailed had been found without its contents at their facility. 

According to Paul, this package was en route from him in Guam to his intended recipient IN ITALY (registered mail confirmation attached) when it must have fallen out of the package in Hawaii. Our address had originally been put on the manila wrapping of the journal just for cosmetic effect. We believe that the post office wrote on our Zip code on the outside of the package and, believing the Egyptian postage was real, sent it our way. From Guam to Hawaii en route to Italy with a stopover in Chicago: truly an adventure befitting Indiana Jones.

Paul has graciously let us know that he will make the intended recipient a new journal, and that we are welcome to keep this one— thanks, Paul! It will find its home either in Oriental Institute at UChicago because, as many have noted, “It belongs in a museum!”. We will post a link here when its exhibit is finished— we hear they’re working in some neat history about the men who inspired Indiana’s character, so it should be way cool.

Thank you to all who have emailed tips or ideas about this document— we appreciate your sleuthing on our behalf! We will now return to this Tumblr’s regularly scheduled programming: providing cool UChicago facts to prospective students. We look forward to welcoming our first members of the Class of 2017  when they receive admissions decisions from us on Tuesday afternoon. 

The upside: Almost everything in this story.

The downside: It’s a tad concerning that the USPS couldn’t tell the stamps were forged.

755 notes 

silvaniart:

What is “Someone who loves you”?

silvaniart:

What is “Someone who loves you”?

442 notes 

kstipetic:

Here is a thing I made to help you art.

kstipetic:

Here is a thing I made to help you art.

21,146 notes 

As a child, I envied Clarissa Darling for many things, but none so much as her choice of pet.
I was so sad when Elvis disappeared in later seasons.

As a child, I envied Clarissa Darling for many things, but none so much as her choice of pet.

I was so sad when Elvis disappeared in later seasons.

24 notes 

themarysue:

potatofarmgirl:

montypla:

odd-one:

montypla:

insanelygaming:

Female Fantasy III

Created by Julia Lepetit & Andrew Bridgman

I agree with the point of the comic, but still stand by saying that FF III is a horrible game and if you want me to play it with you I will refuse

>Play FFIII with you
Implying FFIII is multiplayer.
Implying any of FF I-XIII (at least to the best of my knowledge on VII-XII) are multiplayer.

Final Fantasy XI is an mmo. And it is possible to play normal FFs together with one person controlling and the other there helping.

My brother and I played FF multiplayer all the time growing up.  You can assign character positions to controller two, and we got along just fine.  Jerks.

Reblogging for this magical commentary. 

11,832 notes 

Why Does Disney…

… still use the .go.com in all their domain names?

Is there some secret power behind using it? It seemed like a bad idea back in the 90s, yet they’re still using it. It’d make so much more sense to not have it there.

nervouswanderlust:

holzmantweed:

kayladaila:

thearcanetheory:

thestreetsofmynewcity:

thearcanetheory:

invisiblerobotgirl:

This is my 9-year-old (secular) niece’s #1 item on her Christmas list this year. My aunt, an ordained UCC minister, is buying it for her.

Neither of you are Jewish. That is appropriation.
You can take part in Hannukah rituals if a Jewish person invites you to take part. To do it on your own is appropriation. Please do not encourage that.

It’s for an American Girl doll who is a Jewish (every American Girl character has a backstory/culture), they also have a Sabbath set. I think everything is doll sized? I know that the candles are fake. So, is that still appropriation?  

Well, I don’t like it because it commodifies my culture and makes it literally into a set of toys. Which is a huge problem, and in of itself leads to more appropriation.
But it is not the same as gentiles glomming onto Hebrew cultural and religious traditions and running off with them. Thanks for filling me in, and apologies to OP for misunderstanding.

This is silly.  I don’t usually get involved in religious arguments, but don’t you want to share your culture with other people?  I know I love when my secular friends are knowledgeable about my beliefs.  I always invite non Jews over for Jewish holidays because it bothers me how little people know about our rituals.  If my future kids want to have a kinara in the house, I’d fully support that.  I would love to teach them all about different cultures’ holidays because I’d like to learn too.  It’s a sign of respect for the other culture.  Nowhere did this person say they were going to put the menorah under this kid’s Christmas tree.  So this whole argument is just ridiculous.  That’s not appropriation.   

Your pronoun choice leaves it ambiguous whether you’re Jewish or not.
But let me tell you the story of why my Atheist Jewish parents light a menorah, which is also why I as Wiccan Jew light a menorah, because there’s more than religion going on.
In the 1960s, my parents lived in Cincinnati because Dad had work there.  About the only nice thing you can say about Cincinnati is that it’s not Akron now that their river’s stopped catching fire, but if you were a Jew in the 1960s living there and you had grown up in New York City, you noticed some things about the place.
How few other Jews were around you, for example.  How many locals didn’t much like Jews and didn’t mind saying so.  Not many people know that Ohio has the country’s largest Klan organization, but there you go.
So they started lighting a menorah on Hanukah and putting it in their window.  They weren’t making a religious observance. They were making a cultural statement that might be summarized as:
Hitler missed.
Goyim keep trying to kill us, but Jews are still alive.
We are not alone.
If I as a Jew invite someone, my wife for example,  to join me as I light my menorah, I’m inviting them to share in my celebration of my people’s continued existence — which is what Hanukah is actually about.
If goyim take Jews out of the picture and just light the menorah themselves… well.  Goyim taking Jews out of the picture is why we have Hanukah in the first place.  There’s no such thing as a respectful way to do that, so it does not show respect.  Goyim interacting with Judaism on Jews’ terms, though?  That shows respect.
Nor is “teaching someone about somebody’s holidays” the same thing as mimicking those holidays.
Yes, this is appropriation.

most reasonable responses to moderate to severe ass-hattery 

I’m both intrigued and concerned by how mentioning that my niece is from a secular household and MY aunt (my niece’s great-aunt) is Christian, people assumed that:
1) My niece would be lighting a menorah or taking part in any Jewish rituals without first being invited to take part by someone of the faith.
2) My niece has no Jewish influence in her life or family that might have inspired the desire to have this set for her American Girl Doll.
Yes, it might’ve been better if a Jewish family member was the one purchasing the toy set. But… then I wouldn’t have found it wryly/face-palming-ly amusing and have mentioned it.

nervouswanderlust:

holzmantweed:

kayladaila:

thearcanetheory:

thestreetsofmynewcity:

thearcanetheory:

invisiblerobotgirl:

This is my 9-year-old (secular) niece’s #1 item on her Christmas list this year. My aunt, an ordained UCC minister, is buying it for her.

Neither of you are Jewish. That is appropriation.

You can take part in Hannukah rituals if a Jewish person invites you to take part. To do it on your own is appropriation. Please do not encourage that.

It’s for an American Girl doll who is a Jewish (every American Girl character has a backstory/culture), they also have a Sabbath set. I think everything is doll sized? I know that the candles are fake. 
So, is that still appropriation?  

Well, I don’t like it because it commodifies my culture and makes it literally into a set of toys. Which is a huge problem, and in of itself leads to more appropriation.

But it is not the same as gentiles glomming onto Hebrew cultural and religious traditions and running off with them. Thanks for filling me in, and apologies to OP for misunderstanding.

This is silly.  I don’t usually get involved in religious arguments, but don’t you want to share your culture with other people?  I know I love when my secular friends are knowledgeable about my beliefs.  I always invite non Jews over for Jewish holidays because it bothers me how little people know about our rituals.  If my future kids want to have a kinara in the house, I’d fully support that.  I would love to teach them all about different cultures’ holidays because I’d like to learn too.  It’s a sign of respect for the other culture.  Nowhere did this person say they were going to put the menorah under this kid’s Christmas tree.  So this whole argument is just ridiculous.  That’s not appropriation.   

Your pronoun choice leaves it ambiguous whether you’re Jewish or not.

But let me tell you the story of why my Atheist Jewish parents light a menorah, which is also why I as Wiccan Jew light a menorah, because there’s more than religion going on.

In the 1960s, my parents lived in Cincinnati because Dad had work there.  About the only nice thing you can say about Cincinnati is that it’s not Akron now that their river’s stopped catching fire, but if you were a Jew in the 1960s living there and you had grown up in New York City, you noticed some things about the place.

How few other Jews were around you, for example.  How many locals didn’t much like Jews and didn’t mind saying so.  Not many people know that Ohio has the country’s largest Klan organization, but there you go.

So they started lighting a menorah on Hanukah and putting it in their window.  They weren’t making a religious observance. They were making a cultural statement that might be summarized as:

Hitler missed.

Goyim keep trying to kill us, but Jews are still alive.

We are not alone.

If I as a Jew invite someone, my wife for example,  to join me as I light my menorah, I’m inviting them to share in my celebration of my people’s continued existence — which is what Hanukah is actually about.

If goyim take Jews out of the picture and just light the menorah themselves… well.  Goyim taking Jews out of the picture is why we have Hanukah in the first place.  There’s no such thing as a respectful way to do that, so it does not show respect.  Goyim interacting with Judaism on Jews’ terms, though?  That shows respect.

Nor is “teaching someone about somebody’s holidays” the same thing as mimicking those holidays.

Yes, this is appropriation.

most reasonable responses to moderate to severe ass-hattery


 

I’m both intrigued and concerned by how mentioning that my niece is from a secular household and MY aunt (my niece’s great-aunt) is Christian, people assumed that:

1) My niece would be lighting a menorah or taking part in any Jewish rituals without first being invited to take part by someone of the faith.

2) My niece has no Jewish influence in her life or family that might have inspired the desire to have this set for her American Girl Doll.

Yes, it might’ve been better if a Jewish family member was the one purchasing the toy set. But… then I wouldn’t have found it wryly/face-palming-ly amusing and have mentioned it.

34 notes 

This is my 9-year-old (secular) niece’s #1 item on her Christmas list this year. My aunt, an ordained UCC minister, is buying it for her.

This is my 9-year-old (secular) niece’s #1 item on her Christmas list this year. My aunt, an ordained UCC minister, is buying it for her.

34 notes